Thursday, October 1, 2015

Story of Kullervo Presentation

What was the most surprising or interesting fact, idea, comment you learned from Group 6's presentation on Tolkien's The Story of Kullervo?

5 comments:

Oromë said...

I really enjoyed the discussion on how Kullervo's story from the Kalevala was so essential in the creation of a national Finnish identity, and how Tolkien wanted to create a similar national mythology for his own country. I had never thought of his mythology having that kind of purpose, and I thought it was really interesting.

Vairë said...

I was quite surprised to learn that Tolkien had an interest in such a tale seemingly devoid of overt religious influence. We've talked in class over and over about the religious aspects of his works and upbringing. I suppose I forgot that he read widely, and would have gone beyond the literature he usually inhabited. I still have to wonder, however, what might have attracted Tolkien to this tale in particular upon his initial reading of it.

Nienna said...

I particularly enjoyed the presentation order that placed this presentation after The Children of Húrin. It was extremely interesting to see the similarities between the two stories, but I thought the differences were also of significance. The unfinished tale of Kullervo really showcases how Tolkien grew as a writer and began to craft his own stories with significant influence from other works. I found it particularly interesting how Tolkien used Kullervo to inform his creation of Turin. However, Turin seems to be somewhat redeemable while Kullervo does not. The two stories are extremely similar while emphasizing Tolkien's own creativity.

Tulkas said...

The comparisons were very striking to me, perhaps even a bit overwhelming. I did, however, enjoy looking at this story in its three forms, The Kalevala, The Story of Kullervo, and The Children of Hurin. The original story seems very un-Tolkien, but he continued to work on it until it was good enough. I also enjoyed to comparisons to Greek tragedy, elements of which don't really have a place in Tolkien's main body of work.

Ulmo said...

What surprised me about this work was just the fact that it was unfinished and that Christopher Tolkien still decided to publish it. The incest was weird again, and the group also mentioned that it was somewhat forceful which seemed uncharacteristic of Tolkien. However, I would still like to read it to see yet another twist on his writing.