Thursday, October 1, 2015

Children of Húrin Presentation

What was the most surprising or interesting fact, idea, comment you learned from Group 5's presentation on Tolkien's The Children of Húrin?

10 comments:

Vana said...

I'd never actually read this story, so all the weird bits like suicide and incest were interesting to me because they don't seem very like Tolkien at all. Tolkien likes eucatastrophe, and this story was plain tragedy.

Oromë said...

I agree with Vana. I had also not read this story, and I never would have guessed Tolkien wrote it. It really exhibits his diverse abilities as a writer. I really enjoyed the group's summary, and it makes me want to read The Children of Hurin sometime soon.

Estë said...

I had read this story before on my own and loved to learn more about it. The elaboration on plot and character development was particularly helpful. I was also interested to learn of the similarities of the Children of Hurin to The Story of Kullervo, which seemed equally tragic.

Tulkas said...

I really like that Christopher Tolkien had to piece together The Children of Hurin based on his father's scattered notes. This makes me think that the story would have plot holes or unfinished portions, but from what I gathered it is fairly cohesive. This only makes me want to read it more. It gives great insight into Christopher's determination to share his father's work as accurately as possible, as well as Tolkien's ability to construct a complete narrative in bits and pieces.

Ossë said...
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Ossë said...

I thought it was strange how different this story is from Tolkien's other works. All the character deaths and the incest made me think of Game of Thrones. I think it adds a lot to our discussions on the roles of doom and fate in Tolkien's works. Overall, it sounds like a dismal story, but I still think it would be interesting to read.

Ulmo said...

The tragedy in this work was really surprising to me especially in how often death of important characters occurs in the story. However, his attention to detail seemed apparent in the summary as well, which is a key aspect of his writing and I'd love to read it to see this different spin on his familiar style.

Lórien said...

I think the most interesting this that I learned from this presentation was the information about the talking sword Gurthang. I find it surprising that Tolkien would include this, as I can think of few times where an inanimate object has a will of its own in Tolkien's work. Certainly this is the one of, if not the only example of sentience in an inanimate object. I also find it fascinating that this black sword is labeled as cursed, there seems to be a definite connection between the color black and treachery in Tolkien's works.

Yavanna said...

I came away thinking about the character of Turin and how he was portrayed by the group. I haven't read this book in particular and I may not ever, but I was interested in their conversation about how and why Turin is a tragic character. They spoke about how his inability to listen to others is his downfall, how he could be a great man, a great leader but wasn't.

He was portrayed as noble, but ill-fated and ill-guided. Some of the most famous characters in fiction and history hold a similar position in the public mind, and are by and far often beloved characters. Why do we find them tragic? You'd think that they'd be more frustrating than anything else.

Manwë said...

One of the things I found most interesting in this presentation the discussion on the huge differences between this story and all of Tolkien’s other works. I liked the discussion of Fate/Doom and the differences between the two as well as the differences between oaths and curses. I thought it was interesting that Húrin’s family was doomed in the sense that Melkor had placed a curse on them, yet there was also the thought that Túrin had somewhat doomed himself by the choices that he made- a idea that is much closer to fate than doom. I think the topic of Pride was also essential to this presentation- it is essentially because of Túrin’s pride that the events of the tragedy are set in motion. I liked that the presenters didn’t really go into too much detail about Tolkien’s inspiration and that the Kullervo group was able to bridge that gap.