Friday, January 25, 2013

Radio Play vs Actual Play

If The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth is ever performed, should it be a radio play or a real play?  I would vote for a radio play because there isn't much to see at all.  The stage directions could be read by a narrator.  The sounds of the shuffling and creaky wagon wheels could be made authentically.  I think this story would suit the medium of radio very well because it forces you to imagine what everything looks like.  Not being able to see clearly is a great way to instill fear in the audience.  Shadows and lights are easily represented in the imagination.  Anyway, I think a radio play would be very cool.  What do you all think?

6 comments:

Anna Adams said...

I can imagine it as a real play. I think it would be a pretty short production, but it could be the kind of thing a drama group puts on for fun. They could use lighting to create a sense of creepiness that I don't think would be the same with radio. Anyway, at least I think I would go see a live production of this piece.

Austin M. said...

I completely agree with Ashley's statement. I think a radio version would be the best way to accurately convey the message of the play. However, I think it could also be turned into a an actual play or an incredibly short film. Personally, I would prefer the latter, because of the cool things one could do with special effects, sounds, etc.

sworland said...

I agree with Anna. I think this piece would be best performed as a short theatrical performance. Ashley, I like the point you made about radio forcing you to imagine what everything looks like, but I also think that can be achieved in a play.

Like I was talking about in class, I imagine a dark and foggy stage that still leaves a lot of the visual creation up to the viewer. The slits of light could be a powerful glimpse into the scene which are then hastily covered up again, forcing you back into your imagination.

Performed as a radio play, I'm somewhat opposed to simply reading the stage directions. If you turned those into a narrator part where the directions aren't quite so abrupt, I would like it better because it would maintain the flow of the work.

Julie Lautenschleger said...

While I do agree with Ashley, it would be very interesting to hear this as a radio play, I can only imagine how much the listener would be immersed in the work as an actual play. Especially with the ways that Sarah explained the stage effects, the play could be really spooky! I can only imagine seeing a flickering old lamp through the fog onstage, and how much more that would inspire the imagination (not stifle it at all!). People's imaginations run much more wild in the dark. A play would allow the viewer to more fully experience the writing.
-Julianna Lautenschleger

S. M. said...

I think that it would work well as either a radio play or as a regular play. Like Ashley was saying, a radio production could easily capture the essence of the story. As for a live performance, I agree with Julie that the darkness of the stage would feed the viewer’s imagination (especially since the rest of the auditorium would be dark too). I also think that sitting in the darkened audience would make it easier for people to empathize with the jumpy Torhthelm.

Chimera said...

I think it would make a great one-act. I think the creepiness and the imagery would come across beautifully dark. And because of the language i feel that it would also make it become easier to understand. Especially for a younger audience, such as high school, or even middle school students. Though with that yes you lose a bit of the imagination but if done with the proper lighting it would still be up to the imagination to a certain extent.