Thursday, April 28, 2011

Endings

As we start winding toward the ending of this class, let's reflect on endings. We've read many works this semester and all of them have interesting endings, whether these be a single closure or multiple ones. Which ending of which work do you like the most and why?

4 comments:

Elladan said...

Personally, I love the ending of The Hobbit. Tolkien wraps up the Battle of Five Armies cleanly, and Bilbo embarks upon his return to the Shire. While he returns to a less than peaceful, quiet situation at Bag End, the story is nevertheless concluded neatly, leaving the reader scrambling to pick up The Fellowship of the Ring and continue their personal journey through Middle-earth.

Aredhel said...

Honestly, as sad as it is, I love the ending to The Lord of the Rings. Whenever I think about it, as sad as I get that Frodo leaves (and now apparently DIES :( ), what better way could you end the trilogy? Frodo is such an exceptional character, and he goes through so much carrying the Ring that for him to simply return to the Shire and be perfectly ok is rather absurd. Sam and everyone else also went through a lot and saw tons of horrible stuff, but they all find new beginnings with their families and friends. As much as I hate to see Frodo go, I love that because of his deeds, he is awarded such high honor as to go to Valinor.

Finwe said...

I liked the ending of Smith of Wooten Major and the Hobbit were one of my favorite endings. One I am a sucker for a happy ending,and I also enjoyed the way the power of the star was not hogged but passed on for others to enjoy.

Belladonna Took said...

I like the multistep ending at the end of Return of the King: it prolongs the story (for those who want to keep reading on and on). It shows the hobbits (Merry, Pippin, Frodo, and Sam) transitions relative to other hobbits in Hobbiton. It provides better closure knowing that the “fellowship” can handle their own (don’t need divine intervention or Gandalf). It also complicates the plot as the “fairy-tale” character (Frodo) faces an “epic characters” death. Aragorn (the epic character) lives as a fairy-tale character would. This type of ending is a little different, it emphasizes transformation, prolongs an unwanted end, and allows us to feel a sense of closure by seeing these hobbits (where Tolkien’s works all started) handle their own affairs on their own in the Shire.