Monday, February 7, 2011

The enemy of my enemy is my friend

Throughout the lord of the rings despite their differences different races come together to fight for their lives. This truly exemplifies the ability of different races , perhaps representing humankind, to come together for a common cause. Perhaps Tolkien also was trying to say that petty human differences are of almost no importance when it comes to all living things.

4 comments:

Belladonna Took said...

I think that The Hobbit and the LOTR could not have be published at better times to exemplify this. The Hobbit was published in the 1930s, the decade after isolationism from different countries (thus different races) after the first world war. The Lord of the Rings series was published in the 1950s, the decade after the second World War. Both The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings followed times of intense discrimination and World War. This was perfect timing to emphasize the theme of setting aside differences to come together as human beings.

Radagast said...

This is like how a common enemy will unite former enemies. Like in the Hobbit, during the War of the Five Armies (I think that's what it was), at first the dwarves were fighting with the elves and men. But when the goblins showed up, they banded together to help defeat their common enemy. This is an interesting theme throughout many stories!

Elendil said...

It probably has something to do with the impact WW2 had on Tolkien himself and his friends. Of the Inklings, only like two of the group actually made it out of the war. I think this was part of how he handled the impact of war on his personal life and beliefs. That said, I am grateful for the message of hope and unity. You go, Tolkien.

Fingolfin said...

As Radagast said, when faced with a greater danger all others are forgotten. Gandalf actually SAYS words similar to those as the goblins are arriving in the Battle of the Five Armies. My favorite exameple of this came in Watchmen, when the main villain (I wont disclose names for anyone who hasn't read the graphic novel or seen the movie!) engineered a giant space alien and sent it to attack the United States and force the ENTIRE WORLD to unite against such a foreign threat, actually obtaining world peace through an act of villainy. Both in Lord of the Rings and Watchmen there is the idea of uniting against a greater threat or dying/failing, and in both cases the characters are forced to join forces with those that they would rather avoid (and/or are enemies with) in order to defeat the greater danger.